Application Tips: The Global Leadership Initiative / Blog

Application Tips: The Global Leadership Initiative primary image

Application Tips: The Global Leadership Initiative

We are delighted to accept applications for the 2021 Global Leadership Initiative (GLI), our flagship leadership development programme based at the University of Oxford. Running through Hilary and Trinity terms, the GLI brings together a diverse learning community of Oxford postgraduates to explore the nature of good leadership in the twenty-first century.

The application process is simple and offers a fantastic opportunity to reflect upon what leadership means to you and how you would like to develop as a leader in the years ahead. You’ll be asked to provide some basic contact and course details, a current CV, and to respond to the following short-answer questions:

  1. Who would you identify as a good leader? Why? 
  2. What do you think Character is?
  3. How does character contribute to good leadership?
  4. Describe a time you experienced unsuccessful leadership. Why was it unsuccessful?
  5. What are your career and personal aspirations for the future?
  6. What do you hope to contribute to the GLI and how do you hope to benefit from participating?

These questions are your chance to speak directly to us, showcasing your commitment to leadership development and to your active engagement with the GLI in particular. We encourage you to become familiar with our vision, research and programmes, and to use as much of the 250-word limit as possible for each question.

We’re looking forward to getting to know you through the application process. If you have any questions, please feel free to be in touch.

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